From the grapevine to the winery

We all know how the slow-moving caterpillar turns into a delicate butterfly, but are we really familiar with the process that transforms grape juice into wine? Just like any other metamorphosis, a certain degree of gentleness and a touch of patience are needed. To make white and rosé wines, the freshly harvested grapes are gently pressed to extract the must. This is then left to settle quietly before being transferred into vats where the yeast will slowly convert its natural sugars into alcohol without any loss of desirable aroma and flavour.

"...les raisins fraîchement vendangés sont délicatement pressés„

As regards red wines, grapes are left to macerate in vats for one week to one month. At this stage, a first fermentation of the must occurs under the action of the wild yeast that exists naturally in grapes. This is also when the juice takes on beautiful tinges of red! Then, the wine is devatted and either put into oak casks or stainless steel tanks depending on the oenologists’ mood! The second fermentation starts and the wine begins to develop its own identity and character. The following operations include devatting the wine a second time, bottling it and patiently leaving it to rest in our 10-km long underground galleries.

vignecave vignecave1 vignecave2